stereo stories

Gradually we fitted our disruptive personalities into the contemporary scene of New York. Or rather New York forgot us and let us stay.

“We might ask ourselves, what tools do we have? What can we count on? You can count on yourself. Believe me, your self is your best ally. You know who you are, even when sometimes it becomes a little blurry and you make mistakes or seem to be veering off, just go deeper. You know who you are. You know the right thing to do. And when you make a mistake, it’s alright — just as the song goes, pick yourself up, brush yourself off, and start all over again.”

—   Thank you Patti Smith.
I read HILD over a month ago. It took about a month to finish, since I would binge on it over weekends and then extend it purposefully, in fits and spurts, over subway rides and waiting for people to arrive and even one memorable morning when I got to work and couldn’t stop and just blatantly took it out and had at it.
Since picking it up it has not left my brain and I have recommended it and tried to talk about it to anyone who would listen! It is one of those rare and special books that STAYS WITH YOU and gets embedded in your mental DNA somehow, in startling and surprising and magical ways. 
At points reading this I found myself wishing it could be made into a film but now I think that would ruin it. Even Game of Thrones-level detail couldn’t do the world Ms. Griffith built justice. It is one of the very best books I have ever read.

These Violent Delights Have Violent Ends

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From Publisher’s Lunch; March 18, 2014

Children’s: Young Adult
Larry Schwarz and Elise Allen’s ROMEO, JULIET, & JIM, pitched as an homage to Shakespeare and Truffaut, the star-crossed teen lovers are heirs to rival Parisian fashion houses, carrying on their clandestine relationship  until Jim, a mysterious and charismatic American enters the picture and creates a triangle of interests, to Christy Ottaviano at Christy Ottaviano Books, in a three-book deal, for publication in Summer 2015, by Fonda Snyder at Alchemy (World English).

No doubt the publisher and authors will be pushing the angle of being a kind of Gateway Literary Drug to getting girls to like the Bard. But I’m pretty certain R&J is the most palatable of Shakespeare’s works. Girls tend to be naturally predisposed to like it or at least give it a chance, or skim to certain scenes they remember from the movies or whatever, at the very least. This insults girls’ intelligence. Even if, at the time, men were playing women on stage, Shakespeare wrote love stories and plots and jokes that seem to me to be mostly directed at women. He knew his audience. He knew we were smarter than this.

Also, if two people from rival fashion houses fell in love nowadays, they would simply design a Target collaboration together and both of their companies would profit greatly from the union. I’m sure the parents would be in favor of it. What girl wouldn’t want a Rodarte Laurent sundress for $16.99? 

“It is easy to make light of this kind of “writing,” and I mention it specifically because I do not make light of it all: it was at Vogue that I learned a kind of ease with words (as well as with people who hung Stellas in their kitchens and went to Mexico for buys in oilcloth), a way of regarding words not as mirrors of my own inadequacy but as tools, toys, weapons to be deployed strategically on a page. In a caption of, say, eight lines, each line to run no more or less than twenty-seven characters, not only every word but every letter counted.”